Xenesis acquires interest in Assured Space Access Technologies

0
566
Xenesis CEO Mark LaPenna

Xenesis, Inc., a leading innovator in the free-space optical communications (FSO) technology sector has taken an additional step toward vertical integration in Space Tech by acquiring a minority interest in Assured Space Access Technologies (ASAT).  ASAT is led by Sean McDaniel, also CEO and co-founder of Atlas Space Operations (ATLAS). This move is the result of a mutual vision for advanced space communication technology shared between McDaniel and Mark LaPenna CEO of Xenesis.

While each company focuses their operations in different areas and applications for satellite and space technology, the union will allow for certain synergies to be developed across the teams, as well as lead to better alignment on government and military solutions.

 “We are excited about our equity share in Assured and look forward to further co-development of intellectual property for Airforce as well as Space Force and other Xenesis customers that can benefit from the same cutting-edge IP.”, said LaPenna.

McDaniel spun off ATLAS Space Operations from Assured Space in 2015.  Recently, Assured Space was awarded a Phase I SBIR through AFWERX to commercialize its dual purpose RF Lens based antenna technology while adding value to US Space Force SATCOM and Space Domain Awareness missions. 

“Mark and I have a shared vision for advancing the art of the possible in satellite communications technologies since we met in 2016.  ASAT’s 20 year history working on advanced US Government satellite programs coupled with our recently acquired RF Lens and Compressed Sensing technology brings interesting possibilities to the satellite communications stage for RF and optical.”  This announcement comes on the heels of another recent acquisition by the Xenesis team of a minority equity position in Space Micro Inc. (SMI).

- Advertisement -
Previous articlePhase Four announces new electric thrusters, subscription program
Next articleTyvak announces successful commissioning of Tyvak-0130 Satellite in partnership with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory