SpaceX Starship SN10 high-altitude test flight slips to March 3

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SpaceX Starship SN10 high-altitude test flight slips to March 3

Starship SN10 and test tank SN7.2 stand tall under a hazy Boca Chica sunset. Credit: Nicholas D'Alessandro / Spaceflight Insider

Starship SN10 and test tank SN7.2 stand tall under a hazy Boca Chica sunset. Credit: Nicholas D’Alessandro / Spaceflight Insider

The high-altitude test flight of Starship SN10 has slipped again, as is common with SpaceX’s highly-experimental test program.

The flight was expected to take place March 1, 2021, with Boca Chica Village residents getting the standard evacuation notice the previous night. However, within three hours of that notice the villagers had reported the evacuation was now canceled and the flight was expected to take place no earlier than Wednesday, March 3.

Associated temporary flight restrictions, known as TFRs, and road closures for the flight attempts on Monday and Tuesday were also canceled shortly thereafter, with new backup TFR windows being issued for March 4-6.

Monday’s weather is forecast to be inclement with an approaching cold front causing low visibility foggy conditions with a high chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon, a likely reason for the push to the right. With all previous pre-flight tests for Starship SN10 completed over the course of last week, including a 48-hour turnaround for a Raptor engine swap between static fires, all eyes will now remain on the weather as the major factor for when a launch will take place.

Meanwhile work continues at a feverish pace at the build facility with Starship SN11 standing ready to roll out of the High Bay, SN15 in position to take its place and the very first Super Heavy booster prototypes BN1 and BN2 taking shape nearby.

Starship SN11 peeks out of the High Bay ready to roll out to the launch site. Credit: Nicholas D'Alessandro / Spaceflight Insider

Starship SN11 peeks out of the High Bay ready to roll out to the launch site. Credit: Nicholas D’Alessandro / Spaceflight Insider

Starship SN10 stands ready for a test flight with a freshly reinforced and painted landing pad lined with remote cameras nearby. Credit: Nicholas D'Alessandro / Spaceflight Insider

Starship SN10 stands ready for a test flight with a freshly reinforced and painted landing pad lined with remote cameras nearby. Credit: Nicholas D’Alessandro / Spaceflight Insider

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